Submissions and queries should be sent to editors@interstitialjournal.com.

Approximate Length

Articles have no defined length requirement, but will ideally range from 5,000 to 8,000 words. Reviews should generally be between 1,000 and 2,000 words, though it is recommended that potential reviewers send an initial query to prevent overlap with other authors. Other types of submissions, including artwork, photo essays, and mixed media projects, should be discussed with the editors in advance of submission. We are happy to evaluate pre-submission queries for thematic appropriateness, though such queries are entirely optional and do not guarantee publication. Additionally, Interstitial: A Journal of Modern Culture and Events does not consider simultaneous submissions.

Style

All submissions should be accompanied by a title page including the title of the work, author’s name, contact information (including e-mail and phone number), and a short bio of no more than 75 words.

Submissions should employ footnotes adhering to the The Chicago Manual of Style notes and bibliography guidelines for manuscripts. Bibliographies are unnecessary.

Notes and Bibliography: Sample Citations

The following examples illustrate citations using the notes and bibliography system. Examples of notes are followed by shortened versions of citations to the same source. For more details and many more examples, see chapter 14 of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Book

One author

1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006), 99–100.

2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.

Two or more authors

1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007), 52.

2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61.

Editor, translator, or compiler instead of author

1. Richmond Lattimore, trans., The Iliad of Homer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), 91–92.

2. Lattimore, Iliad, 24.

Editor, translator, or compiler in addition to author

1. Gabriel García Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera, trans. Edith Grossman (London: Cape, 1988), 242–55.

2. García Márquez, Cholera, 33.

Chapter or other part of a book

1. John D. Kelly, “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War,” in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, ed. John D. Kelly et al. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 77.

2. Kelly, “Seeing Red,” 81–82.

Chapter of an edited volume originally published elsewhere (as in primary sources)

1. Quintus Tullius Cicero, “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship,” in Rome: Late Republic and Principate, ed. Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White, vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, ed. John Boyer and Julius Kirshner (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), 35.

2. Cicero, “Canvassing for the Consulship,” 35.

Preface, foreword, introduction, or similar part of a book

1. James Rieger, introduction to Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982), xx–xxi.

2. Rieger, introduction, xxxiii.

Book published electronically

If a book is available in more than one format, cite the version you consulted. For books consulted online, list a URL; include an access date only if one is required by your publisher or discipline. If no fixed page numbers are available, you can include a section title or a chapter or other number.

1. Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York: Penguin Classics, 2007), Kindle edition.

2. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders’ Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), accessed February 28, 2010, http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

3. Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

4. Kurland and Lerner, Founder’s Constitution, chap. 10, doc. 19.

Journal article

Article in a print journal

In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.

1. Joshua I. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.

2. Weinstein, “Plato’s Republic,” 452–53.

Article in an online journal

Same as a print journal, for the most part.

1. Gueorgi Kossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network,” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 411.

2. Kossinets and Watts, “Origins of Homophily,” 439.

Article in a newspaper or popular magazine

Newspaper and magazine articles may be cited in running text (“As Sheryl Stolberg and Robert Pear noted in a New York Times article on February 27, 2010, . . .”) instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. If you consulted the article online, include a URL; include an access date only if your publisher or discipline requires one. If no author is identified, begin the citation with the article title.

1. Daniel Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” New Yorker, January 25, 2010, 68.

2. Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Robert Pear, “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote,” New York Times, February 27, 2010, accessed February 28, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

3. Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” 69.

4. Stolberg and Pear, “Wary Centrists.”

Book review

1. David Kamp, “Deconstructing Dinner,” review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan, New York Times, April 23, 2006, Sunday Book Review, http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/books/review/23kamp.html.

2. Kamp, “Deconstructing Dinner.”

Thesis or dissertation

1. Mihwa Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008).

2. Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires.”

Paper presented at a meeting or conference

1. Rachel Adelman, “ ‘Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On’: God’s Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition” (paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21–24, 2009).

2. Adelman, “Such Stuff as Dreams.”
Adelman, Rachel. “ ‘Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On’: God’s Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition.” Paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21–24, 2009.

Website

A citation to website content can often be limited to a mention in the text or in a note (“As of July 19, 2008, the McDonald’s Corporation listed on its website . . .”). If a more formal citation is desired, it may be styled as in the examples below. Because such content is subject to change, include an access date or, if available, a date that the site was last modified.

1. “Google Privacy Policy,” last modified March 11, 2009, http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

2. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts,” McDonald’s Corporation, accessed July 19, 2008, http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

3. “Google Privacy Policy.”

4. “Toy Safety Facts.”

Blog entry or comment

Blog entries or comments may be cited in running text (“In a comment posted to The Becker-Posner Blog on February 23, 2010, . . .”) instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. There is no need to add pseud. after an apparently fictitious or informal name. (If an access date is required, add it before the URL; see examples elsewhere in this guide.)

1. Jack, February 25, 2010 (7:03 p.m.), comment on Richard Posner, “Double Exports in Five Years?,” The Becker-Posner Blog, February 21, 2010, http://uchicagolaw.typepad.com/beckerposner/2010/02/double-exports-in-five-years-posner.html.

2. Jack, comment on Posner, “Double Exports.”

Multimedia/Artwork

Interstitial: A Journal of Modern Culture and Events accepts artwork and mixed media projects on a rolling submissions basis. Please send a one-page proposal or description of your work, including any relevant portfolio samples, to the editors. Requests for completed works will be issued upon acceptance of a proposal. Please note that acceptance of a proposal does not guarantee publication.

Submission Preparation Checklist

Before submitting, please review the following items:

1. Authorship and title are contained only on a separate title page, and pages are numbered in the document header.
2. Manuscript has been spell checked.
3. Article notes and citations are formatted as footnotes.
4. Submission is saved in a .doc, .docx, or .odt format.

Copyright Notice

Authors are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce copyrighted images, illustrations, photographs, tables, figures, and extended quotations. Sexist, racist, ageist, homophobic, and libellous language is not acceptable. Authors retain the copyright in their own work, and papers can accordingly be translated or reprinted in another format such as a book, provided that full reference is made to Interstitial: A Journal of Modern Culture and Events as the original place of publication.
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